Archive for the ‘Libya’ Category

These articles by debkafile are interesting. According to them, Assad said he would consider the attack on Syria by the US as originating from Israel and will respond accordingly. Is Israel confident that it can prevent Syrian rocket attack? Or is the government of Israel ready to sacrifice its own people?

The highest commanders of the US, UK, French, German, and Italian militaries along with totalitarian Arab Suni states of Saudi Arabia, Quatar, and Jordan are meeting in Jordan for the last meeting before the attack on Syria. If Syria waits until the bombs start raining it may not have a chance and from its view, it should start the conflict that is unavoidable at its own timing and terms. Or Assad will end up like Sadam and Gadhafi that too waiting until the US invaded.

The US and world economy will tank and Obama and Democrats and Western governments should be removed from power. Bankrupt governments ready to borrow more to start new wars until their houses explode. The problem is that there is no real opposition anywhere in the “democratic” world. The only response the people have is a revolution.

 

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First Iraq that is in constant chaos after US troops withdrew. Sunni rule was replaced by Shia rule. US involvement led to half of its ancient, pre-muslim population Christian population to leave. al-Qaeda of Levant has now bases in the Sunni areas od Iraq and expanding into Syria.

Then came Libya where gangs of “militia” effectively rule parts of the country while the “government” has no power. Powerful Misrata militias were said to persecute darker Libyans and other tribes they dislike. Everybody shooting at everybody. And US ambassador Stevens killed by those US supported against Gadhafi under still somewhat foggy circumstances.

Now Syria. “Alawites into grave and Christians to Lebanon” say those that US arms. If Assad goes, that’s what will happen.

In Egypt, a unholly alliance of the likes of Obama and McCain became really agitated when the population-supported military removed an islamic government that was trying to institute an islamic dictatorship. The argument that a democratically elected government is always a good thing does not work when that government does not obey universal rights, as the history of 1930s Germany clearly demonstrates.

Each of these countries was ruled by a dictator that kept peace among its various religious and tribal groups and provided for basic needs to prevent a revolt. Then came the first revolt in Tunisia caused by high food prices which in turn were at least partially caused by burning food in Western countries (yes, burning corn to supplement gasoline led to higher food prices, in addition to China and India population getting wealthier and eating more).

Democracy is meant to allow people to vote for ideas how to run their country but in multi-ethnic, multi-religious and multi-tribal Arab countries it only means that a more populous groups can “democratically” oppress other groups.

The result will be decades up upheaval, inter-communal hatred and distrust, and millions of refugees full of hate and bitterness entering the US and Europe. If you doubt it, look for the former Yugoslavia where inter-ethnic and inter-religious marriages were once common.
Nobody is a winner, except for the asylum patients living in Brussels and Washington laughing on the way to their shrink.

At least that’s what Gadhafi thought he got for giving Sarkozi EUR 50 million to win elections.
Now officially confirmed by French investigative website Mediapart.

US and France-installed regime is killing and torturing worse than Gadhafi – who will bomb them?

The article has the details:

Amnesty: Libyan militias commit war crimes
By PETER JAMES SPIELMANN | Associated Press – 5 hrs ago

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FILE – In this Feb. 14, 2012 photo, Libyan militias from towns throughout the country’s west parade through Tripoli, Libya. This week, Libya will celebrate the one year anniversary of the start of the popular uprising that led to the ouster and killing of longtime dictator Moammar Gadhafi last October. (AP Photo/ Abdel Magid Al Fergany)Enlarge Photo

FILE – In this Feb. 14, 2012 photo, Libyan militias from towns throughout the country’s …
FILE – In this Feb. 14, 2012 photo, Libyan militias from towns throughout the country’s west parade through Tripoli, Libya. This week, Libya will celebrate the one year anniversary of the start of the popular uprising that led to the ouster and killing of longtime dictator Moammar Gadhafi last October. (AP Photo / Abdel Magid Al Fergany)Enlarge Photo

FILE – In this Feb. 14, 2012 photo, Libyan militias from towns throughout the country’s …

NEW YORK (AP) — Armed militias now rule much of Libya, Amnesty International said Wednesday, accusing them of torturing detainees deemed loyal to the ousted regime of Moammar Gadhafi and driving entire neighborhoods and towns into exile.

Amnesty International quoted detainees as saying “They had been suspended in contorted positions; beaten for hours with whips, cables, plastic hoses, metal chains and bars, and wooden sticks and given electric shocks with live wires and taser-like electroshock weapons.”

At least 12 detainees had died since September after torture, Amnesty said. “Their bodies were covered in bruises, wounds and cuts and some had had nails pulled off,” the group said.

The report is a fresh blow to Libya’s new government, the National Transitional Council, which helped lead the anti-Gadhafi uprising that broke out one year ago this week and spiraled into a brutal, eight-month civil war.

Since the war’s end with the capture and killing of Gadhafi last October, the NTC has struggled to extend its control over the vast desert nation. It has largely failed to rein in the hundreds of brigades that fought in the war, many of which now run their own detention centers for those accused of links to Gadhafi’s regime.

Amnesty said it visited 11 detention camps in central and western Libya in January and February, and found evidence of torture and abuse at all but one.

“Nobody is holding these militias responsible,” Donatella Rovera, senior crisis response adviser at Amnesty International, told The Associated Press by telephone from Jordan on Wednesday, a day after she left Libya.

The U.N.’s top human rights official, and Amnesty International, have urged Libya’s government to take control of all makeshift prisons to prevent further atrocities against detainees.

“There’s torture, extrajudicial executions, rape of both men and women,” U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay said on Jan. 27.

Some 2,400 detainees remain held in centers controlled by the new Libyan government, but the militias are holding uncounted thousands more prisoners, Amnesty said. Most are in and around Tripoli and Misrata, the coastal city that saw some of the war’s most brutal fighting, it said.

The International Committee of the Red Cross reported that from March to December 2011 it had visited over 8,500 detainees in some 60 detention centers.

Amnesty International’s delegation witnessed detainees being beaten and threatened with death at a detention center in Misrata.

In a Tripoli detention center, they found severely tortured detainees who interrogators tried to conceal, the group reported. It spoke to detainees held in and around Tripoli, Gharyan, Misrata, Sirte and Zawiya.

The humanitarian group Doctors Without Borders suspended its work in prisons in Misrata in late January because it said torture was so rampant that some detainees were brought for care only to make them fit for further interrogation and abuse.

Rovera accused the Tripoli-based national government of “a lack of political will. They’re not willing to recognize the scale of the problem. It is way, way beyond individual cases. It’s an irresponsible attitude,” she said.

The militias were one of the keys to the rebellion that toppled Gadhafi’s 42-year rule last year, but they are maintaining their independence from the National Transitional Council.

Hundreds of Libyan militias commemorated the anniversary of the anti-Gadhafi uprising this week by allying into a new unified military council.

Thousands of fighters from across western Libya held a mass parade in Tripoli on Tuesday, showing off heavy machine guns and rocket launchers and firing rifles in the air, an outburst that appeared intended as a warning to anyone who might stage attacks during the anniversary.

Some of the militia reprisals are against dark-skinned Libyans and African contract workers who the Gadhafis had brought in for jobs ranging from construction to security and riot control, leading to attacks on so-called “mercenaries” during the uprising.

“African migrants and refugees are also being targeted and revenge attacks are being carried out,” Amnesty said. “Entire communities have been forcibly displaced and authorities have done nothing to investigate the abuses and hold those responsible to account.”

The violence took on an ethnic twist. “It’s hunting down ‘the other,'” Rovera told the AP. “They’re wreaking havoc in the community.”

Amnesty said that militias from Misrata “drove out the entire population of Tawargha, some 30,000 people, and looted and burned down their homes in revenge for crimes some Tawargha are accused of having committed during the conflict.”

“Thousands of members of the Mashashya tribe were similarly forced out of their village by militias from Zintan, in the Nafusa Mountains. These and other communities remain displaced in makeshift camps around the country,” Amnesty said.

Amnesty called for Western pressure on the Libyan government and militias.

Rovera said that from the United States to Europe, “There are a lot of countries and governments seeking contracts in Libya, so there’s no shortage of contacts” that the West can use.

Europe, the U.S. and NATO “should tell them things as they are — the time for ‘wait and see’ has run out,” Rovera told the AP.

Libya

Isn’t it great that Ameica is being bankrupted in order to spread terror and torture in other countries?

“HRW and two other human rights groups, Amnesty International and Doctors Without Borders,

Much of the world hails Moammar Gadhafi’s death as a triumph for the West. But the war that toppled him remains misguided and illegal.

Seven months after NATO’s misguided war in Libya began, Moammar Gadhafi has been killed. While there has not been as much celebration of this in the West as there might have been before the Iraq war, the conventional wisdom seems to be that this outcome has proved the intervention to be right because it “worked.” However, far from vindicating the decision to attack Libya, Gadhafi’s bloody end represents much of what was wrong with the intervention from the start.

Instead of protecting the population of Libya — which is what the U.N. authorized — the West’s intervention allowed the conflict to continue and consume perhaps as many as 30,000 Libyan lives, including many thousands of civilians, in addition to tens of thousands wounded and hundreds of thousands displaced. Rather than the “limited” war presented by the intervention’s defenders, it immediately expanded into a policy of regime change. The official goal of protecting civilians was subordinated very early on to the real purpose of the war — namely, the destruction of the existing government and the elimination of its leaders.

Contrary to the hope that Libya would provide a deterrent to regime violence elsewhere, the political fallout from the war has stalled any international response to Syria’s crackdown. By exceeding the U.N. mandate they received in March, the U.S. and its allies have poisoned emerging democratic powers such as India and Brazil against taking any action in other countries. Libya has confirmed every skeptic’s worst fears that in practice, the “responsibility to protect” is little more than a pretext for toppling vulnerable governments.

Equally troubling from an American perspective is the ease with which the current administration launched a war against a government that had abandoned its former hostility, renounced unconventional weapons and terrorism, and provided some degree of security cooperation to the U.S. Pariah states now have no incentive to negotiate similar deals with the U.S. and its allies, and they have clear incentives to acquire the means of deterring a future intervention. This reduces diplomatic and political options in coping with these states in the future and makes conflicts with some of them more likely.

U.S. foreign policy has already become very militarized in the last decade, and the quick resort to the use of force in this instance significantly lowers the bar to justify future military action. The sidelining of Congress and the American public on the Libya war continues an increasing and unhealthy tendency of the executive to use military force without authorization or respect for constitutional requirements. The executive now appears to be free of all constraints as to when and how to use force abroad, so long as the action can be deemed a success. And there are evidently no consequences for openly waging an illegal war.

The U.S. and our allies attacked a government that had done nothing to endanger international peace and security. It posed no threat at all to any NATO nation. No Western security interests were served by this war, and some may have been harmed as a result. Successfully deposing Gadhafi is bound to encourage future administrations to take similar risks. The U.S. and our allies may not always be so lucky in targeting such an unusually weak, isolated state.

While Gadhafi’s death will mark the end of Western military involvement in Libya, we should not assume that it means that Libya will not be wracked by violence for months or years to come. We should not forget that the worst of the post-invasion violence in Iraq came well after Saddam Hussein’s capture and execution. Just as it was Iraqi civilians who bore the brunt of the war over the last eight years, it has been and continues to be Libyan civilians who are suffering the most from prolonged conflict.

When dictatorships are violently overthrown, their successor regimes tend to devolve into some form of authoritarian government. Political culture, weak institutions, and post-conflict disorder all make it unlikely that Libya will be that much freer in the years to come than it was under Gadhafi. As in Iraq, it is questionable whether the possible gains will be worth the real losses that have already been and will continue to be suffered. As in Kosovo, which is often wrongly held up as a model of “successful” intervention, the post-war regime is liable to be criminal and corrupt. Twenty years ago, the liberation of Eritrea and Ethiopia from the brutal dictatorship of Mengistu was an inspiring story that very soon degenerated into authoritarianism and war. There is no reason to think that Libya’s story will be all that different.

Yesterday, Gadhafi was killed by joint US (Predator) and French aerial attacks. Libyan “heroes” who then found gravely injured Gadhafi beat him and kicked him until one of them shot him to the death.

Killing a POW is a war crime and those who help it are equally reponsible just as a lookout is responsible for a murder commited by those he helped. Howver, it was obvious that Western “leaders” and especially French Sarkozi did not want a trial that would have brought to light their past dealings with Gadhafi.

Gadhafi was a tyrant but he kept a peace among the so called Libyans: Hundreds of Arab, Berber, Tuareg and other tribes of a color scale from brown to black. That peace may now be over and Libya may be entering a period of terrorist attacks and interna strife.

Compared to Saddam, Gadhafi died fighting foreigners (NATO) and their local collaborators (islamic “rebels”). The images of him dying along his people will likely motivate others to avenge his death.

But it may be less about Gadhafi and more about the instability brought by the US which brought to the power small, fundamentalist tribes and helped them defeat large and less fanatical tribes. As the history teaches, majority eventually wins, but not before a sea of blood is shed.

The defense of Sirte and Bani Walid cannot be called anything else but heroic. Against relentless NATO bombing and katyusa/grad widespread destruction they continue resist the invaders.

On the other side, NATO wards from Misrata are plundering Sirte, taking full trucks of anything that is not tied to the ground.

In the meantime, the emergency relief fund in Libya will not help refugees from former Gadhafi bastions Sirte and Bani Walid. The head of the fund said let others help them, we have to spend the money to create a civil society in Libya. That civil society in Libya means not helping people who lost everything is obvious.

Is this the way the US wants to create a unified, harmonious, and liberal society in Libya?

In Libya, Sirte, NATO is pulverizing the city as much as it can to “protect civilians”. Still not enough and “rebels” cannot win. But civilians are starving. NATO and rebels are really winning hearts of Sirte people on the road to democracy. But is not democracy when people do not want to be occupied by foreign tribes?

In Serbia, NATO and EU occupational force (called sometimes NATO and sometimes EULEX) is shooting with live amunition at unarmed demonstrators that are throwing rocks in self defense against buldozers. They sure could not shoot at people in EU or US but Serbs are certainly not human and so it is OK. Otherwise, why wouldn’t they meekly accept what the Sultan (or is Obama Cesar?) decides for them?

Libya is now set to be a scene of multiple battles. Opportunistic and corrupt pro-western former Gadhafi’s henchmen versus Al-Qaida -alied fundamentalists.

The same fundamentalists that US (Obama), France (Sarkozi) and UK (Cameron) armed, trained, and assisted with air support and on-the-ground special forces to win the civil war. Does it sound like Afghanistan and mujahedeens in 1980s?

Ron Paul calls is a “blowback” – when US does “something” (because “something has to be done”) and the result is much worse than if nothing were done.

Guardian is now catching up to what many people have said in the past few months. A growing rift between the National Transitional Council and local leaders exposes conflicting visions for Libya’s future.

And it is not going to be just 2 groups as they both consist of multiple fractions. In adition to that, the foreign powers are not unified either: France, Italy, UK, US will not necessarily have the same policy towards various groups in Libya. Add to it other Saharan countries and China and it may feel like Somalia was just a kiddie play.

As the kids are told: “Don’t play with a knife, you can cut yourself.”

What kind of democracy is in the West that this kind of ruthless and yet totally incompetent dictators (called presidents or prime ministers) get elected?! Roman Empire again, in its last phase…

The best at the end: “liberated” Libyans are quietly waiting for a moment to rise up against their “liberators”.

“In [‘liberated’] Ajaylat, several people said they were still hoping that Gaddafi could make a comeback and were prepared to fight on his behalf.”

“People want Gaddafi. I can’t deny this,” said a resident named Khaled, 40. “We can’t live under the invasion. Even though they are afraid, in a few days people can fight again — men, women and children.”